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Wilder Faculty to Showcase 10 Papers at Global Crime Conference

View of the historic Liberty Bell at Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia. The city is home to the 2017 annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology which will be held November 15-18.
View of the historic Liberty Bell at Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia. The city is home to the 2017 annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology which will be held November 15-18.

By Tiffany Murray-Robertson

For the second year in a row, scholars at the L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs will make a significant showing at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology.

This week, faculty from the school’s Criminal Justice program will travel to Philadelphia to present a total of 10 articles, two roundtables and two thematic panels at the fall ASC meeting. Dean John Accordino, Ph.D., FAICP, will also host a reception for ASC attendees.

More than 3,000 scholars, students and professionals from the U.S. and abroad are expected to attend the annual symposium to be held Nov. 15-18.

The ASC is one of the leading professional criminological associations in the world and boasts approximately 4,000 members from more than 60 countries.

The organization traces its roots back to the 1930s. According to the ASC website, the association is “actively involved with professional societies of criminology worldwide” while maintaining its core mission which includes “the pursuit scholarly, scientific, and professional knowledge concerning the measurement, consequences, prevention, control, and treatment of crime and delinquency.”

This year’s conference theme is “Crime, Legitimacy and Reform: 50 Years after the President’s Commission” and will explore President Lyndon Johnson’s Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Justice.

Empaneled in the wake of a rising crime epidemic in 1965, the 19-member body was charged with the prodigious task of repairing the inequities of the criminal justice system, and, in 1967 released what was described as the most comprehensive evaluation of crime and crime control in the United State to date. The landmark report called for “a safer and more just society” and prescribed a range of reforms including reorganization plans for police departments and new approaches aimed at juvenile offenders.

A list of participating Wilder School faculty, as well the related topics and days they are presenting on, is as follows.

Wednesday, November 15

Ashlee Barnes, Ph.D., assistant professor
Thematic panel: “The use of risk assessment tools to inform and evaluate correctional practices and policies”

Hayley Cleary, Ph.D., assistant professor
Individual paper: “News media framing of police body-worn cameras: A content analysis”

Individual paper: “Factors influencing jail inmates' interrogation and confession decisions making: Results from an American study”

Patrick Lowery, Ph.D., assistant professor
Individual paper: “The attributional contexts of juvenile court outcomes”

Thursday, November 16

Jay Albanese, Ph.D., professor, Criminal Justice program chair and ACJS Fellow
Roundtable: “Teaching transnational crime: Building partnerships across disciplines and organizations”

Jill Gordon, Ph.D., professor and associate dean for faculty and academic affairs
Individual paper: “Inmate optimism and institutional obedience”

Individual paper: “An examination of incarcerated gang members' procedural justice perceptions and their obligation to obey institutional rules”

Christina Mancini, Ph.D., associate professor and Criminal Justice graduate coordinator
Individual paper: “Responding to campus sexual assault: Policy preferences among the American public”

Nancy Morris, Ph.D., associate professor
Individual paper: “Perceptions of procedural justice and self-reported delinquency among adolescents”

Friday, November 17

Jay Albanese, Ph.D., professor, criminal justice program chair and ACJS Fellow
Thematic panel: “Why revisionist histories are necessary and always late: 50 years after the president's commission task force report on organized crime”

Amy Cook, Ph.D., assistant professor
Roundtable: “Public policy and public opinion: Heroin and opioid abuse”

Saturday, November 18

Jay Albanese, Ph.D., professor, criminal justice program chair and ACJS Fellow
Kristy Artello, Ph.D., J.D., assistant professor
Co-authored paper: “An empirical typology of corruption: The underlying behaviors behind public corruption cases”

William Pelfrey, Jr., Ph.D., associate professor and Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness program chair
Individual paper: “A gendered examination of bullying on delinquent coping: Applying general strain theory”